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New HIV cases up 17% on LI in 2021, report says

Newsday

Dr. Sharon Nachman, chair of the Maternal Child HIV Network at Stony Brook Medicine, said the “HIV epidemic on Long Island is under great control,” in part due to effective antiretroviral medications. The network serves as Suffolk’s designated center for children, adolescents, adults and women pregnant with HIV and AIDS.

The New Normal: How to stay healthy during the holiday season

News 12

News 12’s Elizabeth Hashagen was joined by Stony Brook Medicine’s Dr. Sharon Nachman for a discussion on your health.

Veteran shares story of life-saving surgery

WPIX-TV

“I’m lucky. Through the grace of god, I thank everybody from the doctors and nurses at Stony Brook University Hospital, and how they are treating me,” he said. “They are wonderful. I thank them from my heart and soul for what they do for me and for the veterans. Without them we’d be lost.”

LI Iranian Americans seek to draw attention to persecution of women in Iran

Newsday

Lejuez moderated a discussion Wednesday at Stony Brook University’s Marie Colvin Center for International Reporting on the Iran protests where a panel of experts split on calling the uprising a revolution, but noted that young women were speaking out for their freedoms more now than in past protests.

How kelp farming is helping revive the economy and ecology of a Long Island bay

Popular Science

Kelp feeds off excess carbon dioxide, nitrogen and phosphorus. The last two are pollutants responsible for harmful algal blooms that have killed off plants and animals in Shinnecock Bay, said Christopher Gobler, a marine scientist at Stony Brook University on Long Island. Kelp blades are lined with cells containing sulfated polysaccharides, essentially chains of sugar molecules that give kelp its slimy texture. These polysaccharides bind with nitrogen and phosphorus, pulling both out of the water and dissolving the nitrogen into a compound called nitrate. The dissolved nitrogen is what makes kelp a potent natural fertilizer.

Cutting-Edge Tech Enables Veterans Day Stroke Save

Innovate LI

Kings Park octogenarian Joseph Annunziata was driving on the morning of Nov. 11 when he suddenly found himself struggling to speak and extremely fatigued in his right upper extremities. He was already aware of a narrowing of his left carotid artery – a primary channel delivering blood to the brain, face and neck – but this was a worst-case emergency: The carotid plaque had ruptured and completely blocked the artery. Annunziata went immediately to the Northport VA Medical Center, where doctors assessed his condition and quickly transferred him to the Stony Brook Cerebrovascular and Comprehensive Stroke Center.

Long COVID, big financial impact: Working difficult or impossible for some patients

Newsday

At Stony Brook Medicine’s Post-COVID Clinic, Dr. Sritha Rajupet said she has helped patients fill out paperwork to take medical leave or apply for disability benefits due to long COVID symptoms.

Experts explain how to prevent catastrophic flooding on Long Island

WCBS-TV

Wednesday, the Stony Brook School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences explained how sea gates and cross bay baffles at certain inlets could prevent the South Shore from catastrophic flooding.

Study calls for sea gates, walls to protect South Shore from storm surge

Newsday

“To put it bluntly, how many people need to drown before we get action,” said Malcolm Bowman, the study’s author and a professor of oceanography at Stony Brook’s School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences. ” … Do we have to wait for Sandy Number Two to come roaring by before we wake up and say, ‘this was not a freak of nature?'”

Army veteran from Kings Park thanks staff at Stony Brook University Hospital for saving him from stroke

News 12
Those at the VA recognized he was having a stroke and sent him to Stony Brook University Hospital.
Dr. David Fiorella and his team took over quickly before severe damage could be done.
“We already saw from the scans that were done when he got here that he was starting to accumulate some irreversible brain damage,” Fiorella says

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