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Stony Brook Medicine Awarded for Stroke Care by American Heart Association

Sbsh stroke team

Stony Brook University Hospital received the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s Gold Plus Get With The Guidelines® – Stroke Award with Target: Stroke Elite Plus Honor Roll and Target: Type 2 Diabetes Honor Roll. Stony Brook Southampton Hospital received the Gold Plus Get With The Guidelines® – Stroke Quality Achievement Award with Honor Roll Elite and Target: Type 2 Diabetes Honor Roll. These awards recognize Stony Brook Medicine’s commitment to ensuring that stroke patients receive the most appropriate treatment according to nationally recognized, research-based guidelines based on the latest scientific evidence.

Stony Brook University Hospital and Southampton Hospital each earned these awards by meeting specific quality achievement measures for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke patients at a set level for a designated period. These measures include evaluation of the proper use of medications and other stroke treatments aligned with the most up-to-date, evidence-based guidelines with the goal of speeding recovery and reducing mortality and disability for stroke patients. Before discharge, patients should also receive education on managing their health, scheduling a follow-up visit, as well as other care transition interventions. For recognition criteria visit this link.

“I am proud to join a healthcare system worthy of the American Heart and Stroke Association’s Get With The Guidelines® award,” said Dr. Hal Paz, executive vice president, Health Sciences, Stony Brook University. “These designations show Stony Brook Medicine’s commitment to delivering the best possible care to stroke patients across Long Island.”

Stony brook university hospital“We’re proud to have received these awards for so many consecutive years and glad to have helped improve the health outcomes of thousands of stroke patients by implementing the American Heart Association’s Get With The Guidelines-Stroke initiative,” said Dr. Michael Guido, director of the Stony Brook Neurology Stroke Program and co-director of the Stony Brook Cerebrovascular and Stroke Center at Stony Brook Medicine. “Our success is a result of Stony Brook Medicine’s dedicated team of nurses, technicians, radiology staff and physicians, mobile stroke unit EMTs, and other medical specialists in addition to neurologists and neurosurgeons.”

 

In May 2018, Stony Brook University Hospital became the first hospital in Suffolk County to achieve Comprehensive Stroke Center (CSC) certification by The Joint Commission — the nation’s oldest and largest standards-setting and accrediting body in healthcare. This is the highest level a stroke center can achieve, and involves a rigorous screening process. The advanced Comprehensive Stroke Center designation indicates the hospital’s ability to receive and treat the most complex stroke cases. As a certified comprehensive stroke center, Stony Brook provides nationally recognized best practices and a level of care few hospitals anywhere can match. 

The following year, Stony Brook Medicine launched Long Island’s first and only Mobile Stroke Unit Program designed to provide specialized, life-saving care to people within the critical moments of stroke before they even get to the hospital. This allows for time-sensitive stroke therapies to be administered earlier and allows for the transport of stroke patients directly to the most appropriate hospital for the level of care they require.

Stony Brook University Hospital was also named as one of America’s 100 Best HospitalsTM by Healthgrades for stroke care for the past seven years, from 2016 to 2022.

The Southampton Hospital Stroke Team, from left: (First row) Monina Baldo, RN; Lisa Dellipizzi, RN; Deborah O’Brien, RN; Samantha Pullium, RN (Second Row) Rose Paul, RN; Dr. Darin Wiggins, MD; Janet Woo, RN; Catherine Baccelliere, RN; Olga McAbee, MD
The Southampton Hospital Stroke Team, from left: (First row) Monina Baldo, RN; Lisa Dellipizzi, RN; Deborah O’Brien, RN; Samantha Pullium, RN (Second Row) Rose Paul, RN; Dr. Darin Wiggins, MD; Janet Woo, RN; Catherine Baccelliere, RN; Olga McAbee, MD

Stony Brook Southampton Hospital has met specific guidelines set by the New York State Stroke Designation Program to be recognized as a Primary Stroke Center. The Audrey and Martin Gruss Heart & Stroke Center is capable of treating acute ischemic stroke with IV t-PA and provides patients comprehensive supportive care.

“We are dedicated to improving the quality of care for our stroke patients by implementing the American Heart Association’s Get With The Guidelines-Stroke initiative,” said Dr. Fredric I. Weinbaum, chief medical officer and chief operating officer, Stony Brook Southampton Hospital. “The tools and resources provided help us track and measure our success in meeting evidenced-based clinical guidelines developed to improve patient outcomes.” 

“We are pleased to recognize Stony Brook Southampton Hospital for their commitment to stroke care,” said Dr. Lee H. Schwamm, national chairperson of the American Heart Association’s Quality Oversight Committee and executive vice chair of neurology, director of Acute Stroke Services, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. “Research has shown that hospitals adhering to clinical measures through the Get With The Guidelines quality improvement initiative can often see fewer readmissions and lower mortality rates.”

According to the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, stroke is the No. 5 cause of death and a leading cause of adult disability in the United States. On average, someone in the U.S. suffers a stroke every 40 seconds and nearly 795,000 people suffer a new or recurrent stroke each year.

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