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No. 512: In Which Twain Tinkers, Lovelace Leaps And UFOs Conquer The World

Innovate LI

Get cracking: Stony Brook University’s Office of the Vice President for Research has had a busy quarter, providing nearly $400,000 in research funding directly related to COVID-19.Along with SBU’s Institute for Engineering-Driven Medicine, the office has quickly backed 17 unique research projects – to the tune of $398,200 – through the OVPR & IEDM COVID-19 Seed Grant Program, which officially called for applications in late March. Among them: Deep dives into biomarker identifications, multiscale molecular stimulations, novel cyclophilin inhibitors and other pharmacological pursuits and psychological precepts associated with the global pandemic. The funds were made available May 22 and all 17 projects are expected to be completed within a year. “It’s exciting to see the remarkable breadth of topics reflected in these seed-funding awards,” noted SBU Vice President for Research Richard Reeder. “It’s a clear demonstration of the vast expertise and creativity of our researchers across the entire university.”

The fire prophet: Dolors Armenteras on saving the Amazon and fighting misogyny in science

Mongabay

“Dolors’s laboratory has been a pioneer in Colombia and Latin America in the analysis of remote sensors, a work that they have been doing since the 1990s,” Liliana Dávalos, a biologist at Stony Brook University in New York and co-author of the recent study, says in an interview. “Thanks to these studies, she has demonstrated, with figures, the importance of protected areas to curb the deforestation. Another contribution has been generating high-quality data and analysis on fires, since before they became a topic of discussion, in 2018.”

Visitors to NY might have to quarantine

Newsday

If a large percentage of people forgo a vaccine, “It’s going to make it incredibly hard to totally rid the virus in the population,” said Dr. Sharon Nachman, chief of pediatric infectious diseases at Stony Brook Children’s Hospital.

What To Know About Dexamethasone, A Possible Coronavirus Treatment

Bustle

Dr. Mohamed Mansour M.D., director of the Medical Intensive Care Unit at Stony Brook Medicine, tells Bustle that dexamethasone is a kind of glucocorticoid, a class of drugs that also includes hydrocortisone. “The body normally produces cortisol, a weak glucocorticoid, in stressful conditions,” Dr. Mansour says. Cortisol is part of the body’s system for dealing with illnesses and issues, and is essential for lowering inflammation levels. “However, in some disease states or in particular individuals, the body does not produce enough or the levels are disproportionately low.” In those cases, doctors often prescribe dexamethasone, as it’s up to 20 or 30 times stronger than cortisol, and can help reduce inflammation.

Medical experts worried people won’t take vaccine if one is approved

Newsday

If a large percentage of people forgo a vaccine, “It’s going to make it incredibly hard to totally rid the virus in the population,” said Dr. Sharon Nachman, chief of pediatric infectious diseases at Stony Brook Children’s Hospital

To my younger self: LGBTQ Long Islanders share wisdom learned over time

Newsday

Chris Tanaka, 36, of Miller Place, who grew up in Coram and Miller Place, came out at age 16 to understanding parents. “I guess I identified as gay,” said Tanaka, assistant director of LGBTQ* Services at Stony Brook University. Tanaka said that when speaking with LGBTQ students, it’s “important for folks in other generations to be mindful that a lot of their experience and advice are based on things that happened in a different time, and they might not apply in the same way.” Nowadays, Tanaka identifies as “queer” and “gender queer,” and prefers to be referred to by the pronouns they, them and their. Tanaka would tell their 18-year-old self, “Don’t get caught up in figuring out what to call yourself. Don’t get caught up in labels. It boxes you into things that people try to define that aren’t really definable.”

What to expect at day camps this summer

Newsday

Join Dr. Sharon Nachman, Chief of the Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Stony Brook Children’s Hospital; Mark Transport, President of the Long Island Camps and Private Schools Association and the co-owner of Crestwood Country Day Camp; and Dan Weir, Senior Director of Program Development at YMCA of Long Island as they discuss what to expect this summer from day camps, plus which fun activities can help your kids enjoy the warm weather, and more. Moderated by Newsday columnist and editorial writer Lane Filler. Email your questions to nmgevents@newsday.com or use the hashtag #AskNewsday on Twitter.

From The SoMAS Weather Desk: Bad Storms Coming

Innovate LI

From the Never Rains But It Pours file comes this grim long-range forecast, courtesy of Stony Brook University: It’s gonna rain, hard. Like, biblical hard. So says SBU’s School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, which has used global climate modeling to determine that future tropical cyclones – you know them as hurricanes – will produce more intense rains than ever before.

Across LI, researchers explore COVID-19’s impact

Newsday

Researchers in the business, medical, science and social work communities across Long Island are studying the impact of coronavirus on the region. At Stony Brook University alone, more than 180 studies launched since the start of the pandemic from 45 academic departments.

Is it safe to go to a barbecue? Summer party safety in the age of COVID-19

Today

None of the doctors TODAY spoke with were able to provide a specific host-to-guest ratio since there are so many variables at play. But according to Dr. Sharon Nachman, Chief of the Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Stony Brook Children’s Hospital, your party is too big if you can’t easily see everyone from wherever you’re standing. Alternatively, if you get to a party and it seems way bigger than you were anticipating, it’s OK to go home if you feel uncomfortable.

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