SBU News

Press Clips

Netherlands Mourns Flight 17 Victims

CNN

JONATHAN SANDERS, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, STONY BROOK UNIVERSITY: Good evening.

LEMON: Today reports from the Ukrainians that two more jets were shot down while the bodies from MH-17 were making their way back to the Netherlands. Is this situation really more out of control than we first thought?

SANDERS: Well, those Sukhoi-25 planes, and I’ve been chased by those, they’re very scary. They’re planes that were designed to support troops in the field. They did a devastating job in Afghanistan. They did a devastating job for the Kremlin in Chechnya. They don’t fly too high, and they could be shot down pretty easily if you have shoulder- fired missiles. And the Ukrainians don’t have too many of them, and they’re not going to be able to fly a whole lot of air support right now

Crash Victims to Undergo Routine Tests, Experts Say

New York Times

Dr. James A. Vosswinkel, a trauma surgeon who analyzed the injuries of victims of TWA Flight 800, which exploded off Long Island in 1996, said there was little doubt that for those on the Malaysian jet, death, or at least unconsciousness, occurred instantly.

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Dr. Vosswinkel, who is chief of the trauma and emergency surgery department at Stony Brook School of Medicine, said that the combination of the shock wave from the missile blast, decompression as the plane came apart in the thin air at 33,000 feet, and massive G-forces brought on by rapid deceleration would have caused unsurvivable injuries.

Keep Your Teens Safe on the Road This Summer

Newsday

Car crashes are the leading cause of accidental death among American teens, and parents need to take steps to keep their teens safe when they’re on the road this summer, an expert says.
The period between Memorial Day and Labor Day is the deadliest time of the year for teen drivers and passengers, according to the AAA auto club.

News Dangerous Blue-Green Algae Turn Long Island Waterways Toxic

WCBS-TV

Out of control algae have become a serious problem in Suffolk County, and experts said the build-up has turned some of the waterways toxic…"If the water is any suspicious green color, I would say stay away. You don’t want to put yourself at risk," said professor Christopher Gobler of the Stony Brook University School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences

Lauren Wolkstein Talks Stony Brook Southampton and Killer Films’ 20/20/20 Filmmaking Intensive

Filmmaker

Stony Brook Southampton’s 20/20/20 intensive filmmaking course offers participating students an opportunity to learn the practical and technical tricks of the trade from Killer Films’ Christine Vachon and Pamela Koffler.

Lloyd Neck teen receives final cancer treatment

Newsday video

The Gutman family received a shock in January when 18-year-old Kyle was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma. After six months of treatment, Kyle had his final appointment on July 16, 2014, and was given a clean bill of health. Stony Brook Children’s Hospital recently awarded Kyle with the Daniel Brooks Memorial Educational Award.

Stony Brook cancer survivors receive college scholarships

Newsday

For Rachel Ragone, school came first, and no matter how tough things got, giving up was not an option. That work ethic pushed her to fifth place in her class of almost 300 students at Eastport-South Manor Junior-Senior High School.

Instant Death or Blackout

Bloomberg News

The blast force from the missile that slammed into a Malaysian plane over Ukraine, combined with the plane’s dramatic deceleration, probably instantly rendered everyone on board unconscious or dead.
That’s the best guess of James Vosswinkel, a trauma surgeon who led a definitive study of TWA Flight 800 that exploded and crashed off New York’s Long Island in 1996, killing all 230 on the flight.

The Face Of The Millennial Man, Sketched In Data

NPR/"All Things Considered"

Audie Cornish speaks with sociologist and SBU Professor Michael Kimmel about millennial men and how their lives differ from previous generations — by the numbers.

SBU faculty receive biomed research funds

Long Island Business News

Two Stony Brook University School of Medicine faculty members will each receive about $150,000 in funding from the State University of New York Research Foundation to advance their biomedical research. Jessica Seeliger investigates new drug targets for treatment of tuberculosis, while Dr. Suzanne Fields focuses her research on age-related issues, including frailty.

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