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iCREATE Provides 3D Printing to Make Needed Medical Supplies During Pandemic

Icreate cpap

In the midst of the ongoing pandemic, essential medical supplies have been running low, leaving hospital personnel concerned with the dangerous shortages. One instance of this hit close to home — Stony Brook University Hospital had a need for an essential part of its non-invasive ventilation circuits. This critical component of the CPAP/BiPAP circuit is a hollow plastic elbow that, on one end, connects to a mask, while the other end connects to a hose to deliver oxygen to patients in a non-invasive manner. 

iCREATE made an essential part for the hospital's non-invasive ventilation circuits.
iCREATE made an essential part for the hospital’s non-invasive ventilation circuits.

iCREATE stepped up to the plate to provide support by offering the use of its 3D-printing technologies to print these elbow components. “When David (director of iCREATE) approached me asking if I would be able to recreate this critical part, I was unsure if I would be able to,” said John Berwick, an instructional support associate with the Division of Information Technology who partnered with iCREATE to 3D print these parts. “After recently losing a family member and hearing the suffering they went through after eight months on and off intubation and ventilators, I was determined to produce an accurate, functional part, with the hope that I could help others and their families suffer less. I think in the end we produced a part that rivals the original in function.” 

It was this dedication that led to the successful creation of workable elbows that were instrumental in allowing for the CPAP/BiPAP ventilation circuits to remain in use during such a critical time. Berwick took on the detailed work of designing the file, went through a number of different parts and processes, and through this successful collaboration, a workable design was found. 

The hollow plastic elbows made by iCREATE's 3D printers that, on one end, connects to a mask, while the other end connects to a hose to deliver oxygen to patients. 
The hollow plastic elbows made by iCREATE’s 3D printers that, on one end, connects to a mask, while the other end connects to a hose to deliver oxygen to patients.

Such innovation and passion exemplified through this collaboration between iCREATE and the Stony Brook Medicine Respiratory Therapy Department is championed and encouraged at iCREATE — finding creative solutions to abstract problems. 

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  • Congratulations to David Ecker and his iCREATE group for their great work helping Stony Brook Medicine Respiratory Therapy Dept. The efforts of all concerned is appreciated throughout the SB community.

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