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Bluestein Elected to AIMBE’S College of Fellows

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Danny Bluestein, standing between Professor Eugene Eckstein, AIMBE president (left) and Professor Charles J. Robinson, AIMBE vice president, at the AIMBE's College of Fellows awards ceremony.
Danny Bluestein, standing between Professor Eugene Eckstein, AIMBE president (left), and Professor Charles J. Robinson, AIMBE vice president, at the AIMBE's College of Fellows awards ceremony.

Professor of Biomedical EngineerinDanny Bluestein has been elected into the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering‘s (AIMBE) College of Fellows. Recipients of this honor, considered one of the highest in the biomedical engineering discipline, are chosen for exceptional leadership and achievements in medical and biological engineering.

Bluestein, Director of the Biofluids Laboratory in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, has been with the department since 1996. AIMBE stated that Bluestein was elected into the College of Fellows for his leadership in measurements, analysis, and interpretation of flow-induced blood thromboembolism, and structure-function relationships in cardiovascular devices and pathologies.

“The 55 new fellows represent some of the most imaginative and distinguished medical and biological engineers in the field,” said AIMBE’s Executive Director Jennifer Ayers. “Their contributions have had a major impact in biomedical devices and processes, treatment of diseases, and public policy related to all aspects of medical and biological engineering.”

Bluestein’s research centers on the optimization of prosthetic cardiovascular devices, cardiovascular disease processes, and advanced numerical simulations. He investigates blood flow in the cardiovascular system, with a special interest in flow-induced cardiovascular pathologies, and the design optimization of cardiovascular prostheses. Additionally, he studies the effects of smoking and second-hand smoke on cardiovascular disease risk.

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